© 2019 by Snail Co.

  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Instagram Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • YouTube

Herbal Cures: Cuts and Scrapes

April 22, 2018

 

This is the third in a series of herbal cures for common ailments! The first was herbal cures for stomach aches and the second was herbal cures for insomnia

 

These all-natural remedies will soothe and disinfect your minor cuts and scrapes--like your paper cut, or your scratch from cutting up an onion too fast. These options are interchangeable; all work well, so it's up to you to chose which one you like best! My personal favorite is lavender oil because it smells good on top of being amazingly healing. But all of these remedies are great to keep on hand because they all have many uses.

 

 

 

 

The Best Herbs for Cuts and Scrapes 

 

Tea Tea Oil

Pour out some tea tree oil onto a clean cotton ball, pad, or cloth, and apply it directly to the wound. Tea tree oil is a strong disinfectant, but it does sting a little. Use this if you're particularly worried about infection.

 

Lavender Oil

Pour out some lavender oil onto a clean cotton ball, pad, or cloth, and apply it directly to the wound. Lavender oil is far more soothing than tea tree oil, and it's also a good disinfectant. This is generally what I use for most cuts. If you're using a band-aid, you can also apply the oil to the band-aid before you put it on. Make sure you get a high quality oil that's suitable for cosmetic use.

 

Colloidal Silver Water 

Colloidal silver is an amazingly strong antibacterial, antiviral, anti-fungal, and just about anti-everything-bad remedy! For cuts and scrapes, apply some externally using a cotton ball/pad/cloth.

 

Honey

This is a bit messy, but honey, too, makes a great anti-germ ointment! Apply it to your cut, let it sit for a good while, and then wash it off.

 

WILD BONUS: Plantain

If you're out in the forest and suffer a bee sting, popped blister, or skinned knee, look for plantain (Plantago major)! This small, wild plant grows almost everywhere. It has round leaves, basally arranged (meaning they're kind of in a bunch), each with very distinct veins, and the flower that comes up is a delicate microphone-looking type thing (see picture below). Not only is plantain edible, it's also soothing and antibacterial. Chew up a leaf to release the good stuff, and then apply the poultice (aka chewed leaves) to the wound. Let them sit on the area. You should start to feel a pleasant, subtle tingling sensation. If you want to keep moving while the plantain does its work, you can place a leaf over the poultice, and then tie it on with a long blade of grass or ivy root. 

 

 

 

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload

Follow Earthly
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Instagram Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
Recent Posts
Please reload